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Argentine Milanesa

Argentine Milanesa

Argentine Milanesa

Milanesa is one of the most popular dishes in Argentina.

These thinly pounded, breaded and fried pieces of beef are an Argentine staple. They're typically served on a sandwich with lemon and mayonnaise or as the main course with a side of mashed potatoes. Ask your butcher to slice individual cuts into quarter-inch pieces to ease the process. 

Argentine Milanesa 

Serves | 10-12 |

  • 6 lbs top sirloin, sliced into ¼-inch pieces
  • 7 eggs
  • 6 large cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 Tbsp fine sea salt
  • 1 bunch cilantro, finely chopped with stems
  • 2 15-oz containers Italian-style bread crumbs
  • oil, for frying
  • mayonnaise (to serve)
  • lemon wedges (to serve)
  • salt (to taste)

| Preparation | In a large bowl, beat eggs and mix in garlic, salt and cilantro until well combined. With a meat hammer or tenderizer, lightly pound beef until softened. Transfer beef to bowl and place in the refrigerator; let beef marinate in egg wash for 1 hour. Pour bread crumbs into a large rimmed dish and generously coat each milanesa, shaking off any excess bread crumbs, transfer to plate.

Heat a large pan or cast-iron skillet over medium heat and coat the bottom with oil. Once hot, fry milanesa until golden brown and crispy on each side, about 3-4 minutes, adjusting heat and add oil as needed. Drain oil on paper towels and lightly salt. Serve with a side of mayonnaise and lemon.

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Amber is a private chef, food stylist and recipe contributor in the St. Louis area. Having spent the last 6 years in Los Angeles, she also gained extensive knowledge working at renowned restaurants Gjusta, Roberta’s and staging at many others.

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