Dry White Wine

Dry white wine is a great way to add acidity to a dish.

I always keep a bottle of dry white wine in the fridge solely for cooking purposes. It’s a great way to add acidity to a dish; as the alcohol cooks off in whatever sauce or syrup you’re making, the flavor becomes more concentrated, so cook with a wine you would like to drink. Of course, cooking with wine gives you the added bonus of sipping and stirring at the same time.

Mustard-White Wine Skillet Chicken

Mustard-white wine skillet chicken.

Mustard-White Wine Skillet Chicken

The good thing about chicken thighs is that they’re very difficult to dry out, which makes this a perfect no-fail meal. Feel free to turn on the broiler at the end to crisp up the skin for a minute or two.

Serves | 2 |

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 lbs skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs
  • 2 shallots, finely diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • ¼ cup coarse-grain mustard
  • 1 Tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 Tbsp honey
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 to 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

| Preparation | In a cast-iron skillet over medium heat, add oil. Once shimmering, add chicken and brown, 3 minutes per side; remove to a plate. Add shallots to skillet and sauté 3 minutes. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, 30 seconds. Add wine and reduce for 1 minute; add stock and whisk in next 5 ingredients. Return chicken to skillet and cook for 4 minutes per side. Season with salt and pepper to taste; serve.

Rigatoni with Leeks, Sausage and White Wine

Rigatoni with leeks, sausage and white wine.

Rigatoni with Leeks, Sausage and White Wine

Make sure you give your leeks a good wash. I like to cut and then wash leeks in a salad spinner; if hand washing, be sure to dry them thoroughly.

Serves | 4 |

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 lb Italian sausage, casings removed
  • 1 leek, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 3 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 lb rigatoni, cooked al dente, with ½ cup pasta water reserved
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan (plus more to serve)
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

| Preparation | In a skillet over medium-high heat, add oil. Once shimmering, add sausage and brown, breaking up with a wooden spoon, 5 minutes. Add leek and sauté until softened, 5 minutes. Add wine and cook until slightly reduced, 3 minutes. Add butter and reserved pasta water; cook for 30 seconds more. Remove from heat and add cooked pasta, tossing to coat. Stir in Parmesan and season with salt and pepper to taste. Divide pasta between 4 serving bowls and top with Parmesan to taste. Serve.

White Wine-Poached Peaches

White wine-poached peaches.

White Wine-Poached Peaches

Serve this refreshing dessert with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream with dry white wine after a heavy meal.

Serves | 4 |

  • 1½ cups water
  • 1½ cups dry white wine
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp vanilla extract
  • 1 lb peaches, sliced

| Preparation | In a saucepot over medium-high heat, add water and wine and bring to a boil; add sugar and stir until dissolved. Add lemon juice and vanilla extract and whisk to combine. Add peaches and bring back to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer peaches to a plate. Carefully remove peach skins and seal in a glass container. Continue to cook poaching liquid until thick and syrupy, 15 minutes. Remove from heat. Pour syrup over peaches and refrigerate at least 4 hours.

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Julia Calleo is a freelance photographer for editorial magazines including Feast. She is also a food and prop stylist at a commercial production studio and blogger in St. Louis.

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